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4 Tips How To Teach Science Bilingually

Did you know that Lifeliqe is bilingual? All the models available on Lifeliqe have a Spanish translation. This feature makes it an excellent tool for teaching STEM subjects in bilingual classrooms and a great way how to boost vocabulary, both for non-native English and Spanish learners.

You can choose to see the descriptions of every model in English or Spanish only, or you can display both languages at once. Just click on the “Language” button at the bottom panel and choose what you prefer. Introduction notes will appear in the language you set as the main one.

 

Swithing the languages within the app is easy, just click on the Language button. How to use it in the classroom?

Switching the languages within the app is easy, just click on the Language button

 

How to use it in the classroom?

At the beginning of the class, choose two or more different models and divide your students into two or more groups. Find a model that represents a process. For instance, you can go to the Geology library and work with Earthquake and tsunami and the Volcanic Activity. Remember Lifeliqe science curriculum is aligned to NGSS and Common core, so there plenty to choose from to fully embrace the benfits of visual learning!

biling-2
 

Assign your students to create a story that describes the process represented in the model. For example, the origin of a tsunami or how volcano comes to live. The presentations may include the consequences of this natural phenomenon.

They should tell the story in a language that is not their mother tongue. Ask them to prepare a presentation and include all the descriptions that appear in the model. Thanks to the bilingual feature the vocabulary won’t be a challenge because Lifeliqe will be helpful with the translations.

 

 

Choosing a model that represents a natural phenomena will make it easier for your students when preparing a story about the process.

Choosing a model that represents a natural phenomena will make it easier for your students when preparing a story about the process.

To create the story, let the students work in groups and tell the story in the form of presentation. They can use the “Share” function to insert the models right into PowerPoint or Keynote. It will help them to use their imagination and boost their vocabulary.

Share the story with others

When they have the presentation ready, ask them to retell the story to the other group or groups. Let each student speak for a while, for example about one part of the model, representing a particular part of the process, such as epicenter of an earthquake or different types of a stratovolcano.

 

 

Let each student speak for a while, for example about one part of the model, representing a particular part of a process or model in general. Evaluate wisely

Let each student speak for a while, for example about one part of the model, representing a particular part of a process or model in general.

 

Evaluate wisely

Ask the group that is listening to the presentation to write down notes, questions and possible grammar mistakes they catch.
They can use the function My notes and write down their findings right within the app.

Discuss in the classroom

After the presentation, open a discussion between the two groups, and let them share their findings. Work as a moderator.
You can suggest some improvements of their learning stories.

Wrap up

After both groups present their project, sum up the new vocabulary and grammar structures the students used during the presentations, back them up with the specific examples from the slides.